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David Anderson Henceforth LTD - Job ID# for Secret Shopper Myster Shopper David Anderson


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Scam Report: #0064187

David Anderson
Henceforth LTD - not a legitmate business

Job ID# for Secret Shopper Myster Shopper David Anderson

Henceforth LTD
unkown
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Hello,
I`m David Anderson and I am your group regional Instructor from within the USA.Henceforth you will be working with me on the completion of your Mystery Shopper's Position application. Like you already know,Your per assignment wage is $300:00 Flat for working with us .
PAYMENT TERMS:
Your payment would be sent ($300) per assignment funds, Also the company is in charge of providing you with all expense money for the shopping and other expenses incurred during the course of your assignment.All the tools you will needing would be provided to you with details every week you have an assignment.
JOB Description :
1} When an assignment is given to you,You would be provided with details to execute the assignment and in a timely fashion.
2} You would be asked to visit a company or store in your area and they are mostly our competitors as a secret shopper and shop with them to know more about their sales and stock , cost sales and more details as provided by the company then report back to us with details of whatever transpired at the store. But anything you buy at the shop belongs to you,all we want is an effective/quick job and reports.
ASSIGNMENT PACKET :
Before any assignment we would provide you with the resources needed {cash}Mostly our company would send you a check which you can cash and use for the assignment. Included to the check would be your assignment packet .Then we would be providing you details on here. But you follow every single information given to you as a secret shopper .
PLEASE CONFIRM YOUR INFORMATION BELOW TO PROCEED ON FIRST ASSIGNMENT:
Full Legal Name :
Full Physical Address :
City :
State :
Zip code :
Age:
Nationality :
Home and Cell # :
Present Occupation:
Email:
Yours sincerely.
Contact Person: David Anderson
Time: 24 Hours daily by e-mail
Processing Job-Unit.
Secret Shopper®

ID



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Comments

There is no report.. only a copy of the email I received.

What does this guy do? All the information he asks for is public info... so what can he do?

DO NOT FALL FOR THIS SCAM. Unfortunately I did and I am now out almost 2,000.00. and now I am waiting for my bank to come back with charges of me cashing fake money orders. Yes, I did just as they asked, thank goodness I just happened to have the amount of money in the bank to cover these money orders. But I don't know how the bank is going to respond when they discover the fakes. I have tried talking to my local branch where i cashed them, but they were not much help. I have recieved 4 more of these fakes and I holding them to see who to turn them into. I have also filed complaints with Western Union, UPS, USPS, etc... Everyone I can think of. Please Dootz, just throw the email away and don't even mess with David Anderson or any other of their names they use.

CALL THE POSTAL INSPECTORS AT THE UNITED STATES POST OFFICE. I JUST HAPPENED TO RECEIVE THE E-MAIL AND WANTED TO CHECK OUT WHETHER THIS WAS A LEGITIMATE COMPANY AND SAW YOUR E-MAIL. I AM SOOO VERY SORRY THAT THESE DISHONEST PEOPLE ARE GETTING AWAY WITH STEALING FROM INNOCENT PEOPLE LIKE US. I WORKED FOR THE USPS FOR MANY YEARS AND THEM SENDING YOU FAKE MONEY ORDERS IS CONSIDERED "MAIL FRAUD" AND IS A "FEDERAL OFFENSE". THE USPS POSTAL INSPECTORS ARE EQUAL TO THE FEDERAL POLICE.
THIS IS A GOOD PLACE TO START.
GOOD LUCK,
ANGEL

Angel,
Thanks for the info. At this point I have filed complaints with every agency I can think of. Western Union gave me a whole list of phone numbers and emails addresses where I can file complaints. I am on my way to the post office today to turn in the 4 fakes I have now.

I'm sorry to hear that some of you fell for this scam and are out this money. This type of fraud is classified as an "Advance Fee" scam, and the Mystery Shopper version is the most recent method that these fraudsters are using. The Advance Fee type of scam is one of the oldest tricks in the books and I'm simply stunned and saddened to hear that there are still people out there who don't recognize it when it is happening, and some end up in serious financial straits.

The way to spot a scam artist or fraud in these types of situations is quite simple......If they want you to cash checks or money orders for an amount greater than what is owed and then SEND BACK MONEY to them - IT'S A SCAM!!!!!

If you are involved in any type of deal where someone wants to pay you by money order, never give back any money unless and until your bank tells you that the funds have cleared and that the money order was real, verifiable, and authentic. Regardless of how much pressure someone is putting on you to send back the money to them, you MUST wait until your bank tells you that the issuing bank has processed the payment and the funds have cleared. Money orders take about three weeks to clear after you deposit them into your account. This is why these Scam Artists use them.....they know that they have a 3 week window of opportunity to rip you off before you are notified by your bank that the money orders were fake, and you are now responsible for giving back all of the money that you took when you cashed the check/money order - plus, they will charge you with NSF fees. Because you were the LAST PERSON TO SIGN the check or money order, they can actually press charges against you for fraud! You are 100% responsible for this money, and the person who sent you the fake money order is now long gone. The best thing to do is never get involved in this type of transaction in the first place.....because anytime someone is overpaying you and asking you to wire back the overage, it`s going to be a SCAM!

Besides this newest Mystery Shopper version of the scam, here are some other variations to look out for:
1. CLASSIFIED AD SCAM: You list an item for sale online, such as on Craigslist or Kijiji. A "Buyer" contacts you, telling you that they would like to buy the item from you, but they are currently out of the state or the country, so they want to have it shipped to them. They send you a money order to cover the amount of the item for sale, and to cover the costs of shipping the item to them. Once you cash the money order, a "Courier" will arrive from a "Shipping Company" to pick up the item they are buying from you. Using the funds from the now cashed money order, you will then pay the Courier the amount that he requires for shipping costs when he arrives. Some of the Fraudsters will tell you that you can keep any extra amount of money after you pay the Courier and after you take out the money to cover the cost of the item you are selling; Others will ask that you send back the overage to them via Western Union, and they ask that you give them the confirmation code for the wire transfer so that they can pick up the "leftover funds" from the transaction. 3 weeks later, the money order bounces. You are now out all of the money, all of the bank fees, and the item you sold is gone - and so is the guy who "bought" it from you! He and his so-called Courier are either working together or are one and the same person, and you have just cashed a fake money order for them, and handed the cash right to them.....and you gave away your item to them for free.

2. Another variation of the item for sale scam is that the fake buyer will send you the money order for the item and for the shipping, and then ask that you cash the money order and then wire transfer the money to a (fake) shipping company, using Western Union or Moneygram. Once you do this, no shipping company ever arrives to pick up your item for sale, and of course a few weeks later the money order bounces and you are stuck paying that money back to your bank (or wherever you cashed it).

3. Property or Vacation rentals: The scam artist expresses interest in renting a property for a much higher than normal rate, usually for an upcoming honeymoon, business trip, etc. The fraudster also offers to pay all fees "up front," as soon as the unsuspecting unit owner agrees to the windfall rental. Eventually a very official looking money order/cashier's check arrives. About this time the scam artist requests that a portion of the rental fee be returned for some compelling reason... such as the wedding being called off, a death in the family, or a business failure, etc. The scam artist asks the owner of the unit to refund the money to him via wire transfer. The unit owner is encouraged to retain "a fair amount" of money to compensate him for his time. The wire transfer is sent, only to find out later that the official looking check was indeed fake and the entire amount is charged back to the unit owner by his bank.

4. Another variation of the property rental scam......A foreign student, doctor, etc. contacts a landlord seeking accommodation. Once the terms are negotiated, a forged check is forwarded for a greater amount than negotiated. Then some emergency comes up where some part of the amount is requested to be urgently wired back. The reverse may also happen, where the Scam Artist posts an accommodation for rent, and requests monies be wired as deposit. The victim arrives to discover they have no accommodation, and the Scam Artist is long gone - as wire transfers are relatively untraceable.

5. Blind/Deaf/Disabled/Unable to write a check for some odd reason Scam. A potential victim is contacted either via the internet or phone through the use of a phone operator who translates TTD calls, speaking for the Scam Artist directly to the potential victim. (Phone companies are NOT allowed to interfere with these types of calls, even when they know or suspect that a fraudulent activity is taking place.) Using a phone company TTD translator actually gives confidence to the potential victim that the call is legitimate, and that they are actually being contacted by a person who truly needs help. Some of these check writing & cashing scammers use multiple victims at multiple stages of the scam. A potential victim in the US or other "safe" country such as the UK or Canada is approached with an offer to fill out checks for the Scam Artist - using a disability or some story as to why he is unable to write out the checks himself. Many times the Scammer finds you on a resume posting website, and asks if you would be interested in taking this type of `Job`, which he would pay you for your services. The blank checks are usually sent to the victim, asking that he fill out the checks and then mail them to other victims who cash the check and wire the money to the scammer. The check mailer waits to be paid for having written these checks for his `boss`- but the payment never occurs, and in fact the check mailer is often conned into paying for the production and shipping costs of the checks. The check information has either been stolen or fictionalized and the checks forged. The victim mailing the check is usually far easier to track (and prosecute) than the scammer, so when the checks turn up as fraudulent, the one mailing them usually ends up not only facing federal bank fraud and conspiracy charges, but liability for the full amount of all of the fraudulent checks. Because the victim - the check mailer - is taking the fall, the scammer is even less likely to be caught, which makes it a popular variation of the scam for scammers in nations with tougher anti-fraud laws.

There are lots of Scam Artists out there, and they try every trick they can think of to get your money. If you receive a letter telling you that you have won millions of dollars in a lottery that you never entered and never heard of - it`s a SCAM! They will ask you to send THEM money in order for them to pay you these lottery winnings. Have you EVER in your life heard of any legitimate lottery that notifies winners via e-mail? (usually without mentioning your name in the message - they simply say Hello, but never do they know your full name!)....of course not! Have you ever legitimately won a sum of money from a lottery that you never entered? Have you ever heard of anyone receiving lottery winnings from a lottery in another country that they have never visited and never purchased a lottery ticket from? Do lottery winners in any US state or any province in Canada have to pay an upfront fee to `release` the winnings to them, which they are required to pay to some random attorney via a wire transfer? NO, No, and NO!!! It`s fake. Don`t fall for it.

How about the ever popular Nigerian Money Scam - aka 419 Scam - where some random person contacts you, asking for your help in getting money out of their country. They usually claim that their father was assassinated and they have to leave their country and need your help in getting the families hidden millions of dollars out of their country and into a bank account in your country....all you have to do for them is send them some money in order to buy them a plane ticket or a release fee or legal fees or interest, etc., etc., - the list of excuses they provide are endless. Some people have lost their life`s savings and their homes in order to send money to these fraudsters, all because they keep believing that at the end of it all, millions of dollars will be handed over to them! If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is! And in the case of the 419 Scam, it ALWAYS is!

Recently, the Scam Artists have been going back to previous victims, pretending that they represent some government organization that helps people who were victimized by a 419 scam artist. The scammer contacts the victim saying that their organization can track and apprehend the scammer and recover the money lost by the victim, for a price. Alternatively, the scammer may say that a fund has been set up by the Nigerian government to compensate victims of 419 fraud, and all that is required is proof of loss (which usually includes personal information) and a processing and handling fee to release the amount of the claim. The scammer is counting on the victim's dire need to recover their lost money, as well as the fact that they have fallen victim before and are therefore susceptible to such scams. Often, these scams are perpetrated by the exact same scammer who conned the victim in the first place, as an attempt to ensure the scammer gets every penny possible from the victim. Alternatively, the original scammer "sells" a list of the people he has scammed but who have ceased contact to another scammer who runs the recovery scam. Sometimes the scammer impersonates the foremost "fraud related crime-fighters" in Nigeria, the EFCC (Economic and Financial Crimes Commission), which not only adds credibility to the scam, but tarnishes the reputation of the EFCC once this second scam is discovered.

There are newer and more complicated versions of these scams happening all the time. The `Romance Scam`takes place when the Scam Artist finds someone via an online matchmaker service. They prey on usually older, divorced or widowed lonely women, because many of them are more gullible due to their desire to find love. They develop a relationship with these women, writing love letters back and forth, sending photos of themselves (which are always fake) and then when it is finally time to meet in person, they come up with some sob story about how they were recently robbed and have no money.....or that someone in their family is ill and needs money for surgery or to go to the doctor, or simply that they need money to purchase a passport and a plane ticket. If the woman insists that she buys the plane ticket for them, they will not show up at the airport; instead, they wait a few days and then contact the woman, telling them about how they were in a horrible automobile accident on the way to the airport, and the hospital will not release him unless he pays his hospital bill in cash - and could she please wire transfer the money to his relative so that he can pick it up for him and pay the hospital bill - this way he can get out of the hospital and fly out to see her. The woman sends the money, and waits for her potential new lover to arrive.....which he never does. He will continue to have legal troubles or financial troubles or problems leaving the country, all of which will require her to send more money to help him, so that he can finally come to her. This will continue on for as long as the woman continues to fall for it and send money to him.

There is the `Vehicle Matching service`scam; The Hitman scam; The pet for sale scam; The Charity Scam; Bomb threat scams; the Au Pair or Babysitter scam.....the list goes on and on! Google them, study them, learn them all! FALL FOR NONE!

Dootz, avoid this guy and his emails like the plague!!! I unfortunately didn't know he was a fake and he took me for almost $2,000.00. And now I don't know how my bank, or even law enforcement is gonna do when they discover that I cashed fake money orders at my bank. I did notify my local branch, but I don't think they even filed a report. Just told me that the bank may close my account and may involve law enforcement. I am scared ***tless need less to say. Delete any and all of these emails. Just in my 1 time dealing with them, I have uncovered numerous phone numbers, emails addresses, addresses, etc... I even got an Overnight Express delivery of 4 more money orders to do the same scheme again. And since I haven't done it yet, they are really on me to get this "assignment" done ASAP. Be careful with these people. Just delete them and report them to the MSPA as well, that is my next job. They are a real org, David Anderson, or whatever his name is today, is not. And the real MSPA wants to know who is doing their good name harm.

ALSO CONTACT THE USPS POSTAL INSPECTORS. THIS IS CONSIDERED MAIL FRAUD AND IS A FEDERAL OFFENSE. I JUST RECEIVED THE STANDARD E-MAIL AND WAS INVESTIGATING THE COMPANY NAME AND SAW THE SCAM. I WORKED FOR THE POSTAL SERVICE FOR YEARS AND THE POSTAL INSPECTORS ARE CONSIDERED FEDERAL POLICE.\
GOOD LUCK,
ANGEL

I'm still confused....he sent you money orders, and you cashed them? How did he get your money? Or, did he simply get you in hot water with cashing forged money orders? Please explain.

Dootz, after doing research on Mystery Shopper, which is a real legal company, I was sent 2 money order so cah, then do a western union transfer with the cash from cashing the money orders. Well, the money orders are counterfiet. At least the 4 I have now. But the bank took them, they look and feel so real and have all the watermarks and anti theft marks they should like real ones. So, when the bank finds out that the money orders are not real, I will have to cover the amount that the money orders were for. I was looking into becoming a mystery shopper and I guess I intercepted an email assuming it was from the real mystery shopper program. The email even gave me the real mystery shopper web site. So, everyone beware.

I continuously receive emails like this and have never responded as I am of the thought process, if it sounds too good to be true it probably is. What I do not understand is how does he make any money if you are cashing checks or money orders that he sends? Do you send him money back? Does he have your banking information? Just a curious consumer wanting to pass the details to friends that think this is a great way of making fast money...haha as if there were such a thing.

domprincess, they sent me (fake) moneyorders to cash, then I cashed them and did a wester union transfer. So they got the real money, mine, I inadvertantly cashed counterfiet money orders. I, like you am susally suspicious of all these scams, but I had been looking into mystery shopper at the same time I recieved his emai telling me that they got my app and had a job for me. I assumed it was the real thing do to the fact that I was kinda expecting to hear from mystery shopper. However all theywanted from me was name address and phone number. Not all this info I see on this letter on this site. Be ware and good luck and thank for everyones help

I fell for this also and exact same thing I am now out almost 2000. I am a certified mystersy shopper and they did have all the legit marks on them, they were very hard to prove they were fake. However, banks like Chase that say they have fraud protection should be a little bit better at helping u and not locking ur account and charging u all the money., We are victims, not the scam artist

Mystery woman,
How long have you been a mystery shopper? Because now I am very afraid to get involved with them at all. I mean, obviously, you must have had to do transaction similar to this if you got hooked with this and didn't question it. I know mystery shopping will ask you to do bank transactions, but do they normally pay this much for those transactions? I am just curious. Did they get you with the money order scam too? How many did they send you and how much did they ask you to wire? The sent me 2 for over 900.00 ea and told me to cash them at my bank, then send 1585.00 via western union and keep the ramaining $250.00 for me. My bank, US Bank, had no problem cashing the money orders, she didn't even hesitate when she held them up and looked for the water marks and security marks. She just counted out almost $2000.00 to me, no problem. Of course, my account had just happened to have enough in it to cover them if they don't pass inspection down the line. But the money that is in the bank to cover the cashing of them is my Social Security check and that has to pay my rent, bills and buy food. Now I can't touch any of it until I find out if the money orders do come back. These bastards should be hung for what they do to people like us. Just trying to make a few extra bucks to help us get by each month. I have done other things on line to make money and have never had a problem. I take surveys and make money for everyone I take, plus the are always sending me stuff to test and I get paid to test the stuff and then get to keep it. I get all kinds of stuff from food to bath products to kitchen gadgets. And I have never had a problem with that. I am so angry that I got caught up in this one, I am smarter than that, well, I thought I was anyway. Clearly I am not as smart as I thought I was. I am just going to keep doing my surveys and testing products like I have been doing for years. No more new stuff for me.
Good Luck Mystery and I am sorry they got you too. I know how ya feel...

I'm sorry to hear that some of you fell for this scam and are out this money. This type of fraud is classified as an "Advance Fee" scam, and the Mystery Shopper version is the most recent method that these fraudsters are using. The Advance Fee type of scam is one of the oldest tricks in the books and I'm simply stunned and saddened to hear that there are still people out there who don't recognize it when it is happening, and some end up in serious financial straits.

The way to spot a scam artist or fraud in these types of situations is quite simple......If they want you to cash checks or money orders for an amount greater than what is owed and then SEND BACK MONEY to them - IT'S A SCAM!!!!!

If you are involved in any type of deal where someone wants to pay you by money order, never give back any money unless and until your bank tells you that the funds have cleared and that the money order was real, verifiable, and authentic. Regardless of how much pressure someone is putting on you to send back the money to them, you MUST wait until your bank tells you that the issuing bank has processed the payment and the funds have cleared. Money orders take about three weeks to clear after you deposit them into your account. This is why these Scam Artists use them.....they know that they have a 3 week window of opportunity to rip you off before you are notified by your bank that the money orders were fake, and you are now responsible for giving back all of the money that you took when you cashed the check/money order - plus, they will charge you with NSF fees. Because you were the LAST PERSON TO SIGN the check or money order, they can actually press charges against you for fraud! You are 100% responsible for this money, and the person who sent you the fake money order is now long gone. The best thing to do is never get involved in this type of transaction in the first place.....because anytime someone is overpaying you and asking you to wire back the overage, it`s going to be a SCAM!

Besides this newest Mystery Shopper version of the scam, here are some other variations to look out for:
1. CLASSIFIED AD SCAM: You list an item for sale online, such as on Craigslist or Kijiji. A "Buyer" contacts you, telling you that they would like to buy the item from you, but they are currently out of the state or the country, so they want to have it shipped to them. They send you a money order to cover the amount of the item for sale, and to cover the costs of shipping the item to them. Once you cash the money order, a "Courier" will arrive from a "Shipping Company" to pick up the item they are buying from you. Using the funds from the now cashed money order, you will then pay the Courier the amount that he requires for shipping costs when he arrives. Some of the Fraudsters will tell you that you can keep any extra amount of money after you pay the Courier and after you take out the money to cover the cost of the item you are selling; Others will ask that you send back the overage to them via Western Union, and they ask that you give them the confirmation code for the wire transfer so that they can pick up the "leftover funds" from the transaction. 3 weeks later, the money order bounces. You are now out all of the money, all of the bank fees, and the item you sold is gone - and so is the guy who "bought" it from you! He and his so-called Courier are either working together or are one and the same person, and you have just cashed a fake money order for them, and handed the cash right to them.....and you gave away your item to them for free.

2. Another variation of the item for sale scam is that the fake buyer will send you the money order for the item and for the shipping, and then ask that you cash the money order and then wire transfer the money to a (fake) shipping company, using Western Union or Moneygram. Once you do this, no shipping company ever arrives to pick up your item for sale, and of course a few weeks later the money order bounces and you are stuck paying that money back to your bank (or wherever you cashed it).

3. Property or Vacation rentals: The scam artist expresses interest in renting a property for a much higher than normal rate, usually for an upcoming honeymoon, business trip, etc. The fraudster also offers to pay all fees "up front," as soon as the unsuspecting unit owner agrees to the windfall rental. Eventually a very official looking money order/cashier's check arrives. About this time the scam artist requests that a portion of the rental fee be returned for some compelling reason... such as the wedding being called off, a death in the family, or a business failure, etc. The scam artist asks the owner of the unit to refund the money to him via wire transfer. The unit owner is encouraged to retain "a fair amount" of money to compensate him for his time. The wire transfer is sent, only to find out later that the official looking check was indeed fake and the entire amount is charged back to the unit owner by his bank.

4. Another variation of the property rental scam......A foreign student, doctor, etc. contacts a landlord seeking accommodation. Once the terms are negotiated, a forged check is forwarded for a greater amount than negotiated. Then some emergency comes up where some part of the amount is requested to be urgently wired back. The reverse may also happen, where the Scam Artist posts an accommodation for rent, and requests monies be wired as deposit. The victim arrives to discover they have no accommodation, and the Scam Artist is long gone - as wire transfers are relatively untraceable.

5. Blind/Deaf/Disabled/Unable to write a check for some odd reason Scam. A potential victim is contacted either via the internet or phone through the use of a phone operator who translates TTD calls, speaking for the Scam Artist directly to the potential victim. (Phone companies are NOT allowed to interfere with these types of calls, even when they know or suspect that a fraudulent activity is taking place.) Using a phone company TTD translator actually gives confidence to the potential victim that the call is legitimate, and that they are actually being contacted by a person who truly needs help. Some of these check writing & cashing scammers use multiple victims at multiple stages of the scam. A potential victim in the US or other "safe" country such as the UK or Canada is approached with an offer to fill out checks for the Scam Artist - using a disability or some story as to why he is unable to write out the checks himself. Many times the Scammer finds you on a resume posting website, and asks if you would be interested in taking this type of `Job`, which he would pay you for your services. The blank checks are usually sent to the victim, asking that he fill out the checks and then mail them to other victims who cash the check and wire the money to the scammer. The check mailer waits to be paid for having written these checks for his `boss`- but the payment never occurs, and in fact the check mailer is often conned into paying for the production and shipping costs of the checks. The check information has either been stolen or fictionalized and the checks forged. The victim mailing the check is usually far easier to track (and prosecute) than the scammer, so when the checks turn up as fraudulent, the one mailing them usually ends up not only facing federal bank fraud and conspiracy charges, but liability for the full amount of all of the fraudulent checks. Because the victim - the check mailer - is taking the fall, the scammer is even less likely to be caught, which makes it a popular variation of the scam for scammers in nations with tougher anti-fraud laws.

6. Pet For Sale scheme: Similar to the Classified Ad or Craigslist Scam......A potential victim is found through the classified ads, someone who has posted an ad selling their dog or cat or puppies, etc. The Scam Artist is usually calling from outside of the country - Ghana, Nigeria, and the Ivory Coast are the most common - so they make the call through an untraceable call relay system. They speak to the seller about purchasing the pet, and express a high level of interest in the pet for sale. In order to build trust, the scam artist asks for the sellers e-mail address, and then proceeds to send e-mail messages to the seller, asking more questions about the pet, and demonstrating his increasing desire to buy the animal. After a few messages have transpired back and forth between the Scam Artist and the Seller, the fake buyer then tells the seller of the animal that he is not located close enough to him to pick up the animal in person, and wants to know if the Seller would be willing to ship the pet to him if he sends him the money for the shipping. The structure of the scam is that the seller of the animal (the victim) will now have developed trust in the buyer, due to the number of conversations they have already had, and he has managed to obtain the asking price of the animal in full. Because of this trust and because he is happy to be paid the full fee for the animal, he agrees to take a check or money order for the amount of the pet plus the shipping fees. The victim also agrees to cash the check and then wire the funds to the shipping company - who is actually the scammer - through a Western Union location. The "shipper" is often non-existent and described as being "private". Once the money has been wired, the scammer wins - the check or money order bounces, and no shipping company ever shows up for the animal. The only bright spot in this scam is that the seller never actually ships the animal to the scam artist. Instead, he cashes a fake check and sends most of the money back to the Scammer; he loses the money that he thought he had made in the sale of this animal, and he gets stuck having to reimburse it to his bank for the entire amount.

Along these same lines, the scam artist might also pose as a person who is selling the pet. A scammer first posts an advertisement or sets up a web page offering puppies for adoption or for sale at a ridiculously low price, most often using stolen pictures from other websites and respectable breeders. When a victim responds to the ad and questions the lowered price or the reason for giving up such an expensive pet, the scammer first explains that they have recently moved to Nigeria or Cameroon from the US for work (usually volunteer work as missionaries or a UN transfer) or for studies, and claims either to have no time to properly care for the pet, that the weather has had such a terrible toll on the pet, or that they have too many pets to care for- often asking if the potential buyer (victim) would be willing to send photos of the pet back to him afterwards, so that the seller knows their once loved pet is in a good home and is happy - this is done so that the victim does not suspect a scam.

Once the Scam Artist tells the victim that he believes they offer the right home for the pet, the scammer offers to ship the pet, and requests the victim only pay for shipping, or comes off the original price substantially to seem legitimate. The victim, who now has an emotional attachment to the pet, feels obligated and even happy to do so, as shipping is a small price to pay compared to the pet's full price at a shop or breeder. The scammer requests Western Union or MoneyGram (untraceable and irreversible) to keep the deal going in a timely fashion as the pet is ready to go to a new home and the victim is now excited. However, after wiring money, the victim does not receive the pet (as it does not exist), and if the victim does hear from the scammer again it is only for more money (to get animal out of airport holding/quarantine, "refundable" life-insurance fees or to pay unexpected vet bills that have come up) until the victim stops responding. This is extremely common currently in Nigeria and Cameroon.

There are lots of Scam Artists out there, and they try every trick they can think of to get your money. If you receive a letter telling you that you have won millions of dollars in a lottery that you never entered and never heard of - it`s a SCAM! They will ask you to send THEM money in order for them to pay you these lottery winnings. Have you EVER in your life heard of any legitimate lottery that notifies winners via e-mail? (usually without mentioning your name in the message - they simply say Hello, but never do they know your full name!)....of course not! Have you ever legitimately won a sum of money from a lottery that you never entered? Have you ever heard of anyone receiving lottery winnings from a lottery in another country that they have never visited and never purchased a lottery ticket from? Do lottery winners in any US state or any province in Canada have to pay an upfront fee to `release` the winnings to them, which they are required to pay to some random attorney via a wire transfer? NO, No, and NO!!! It`s fake. Don`t fall for it.

How about the ever popular Nigerian Money Scam - aka 419 Scam - where some random person contacts you, asking for your help in getting money out of their country. They usually claim that their father was assassinated and they have to leave their country and need your help in getting the families hidden millions of dollars out of their country and into a bank account in your country....all you have to do for them is send them some money in order to buy them a plane ticket or a release fee or legal fees or interest, etc., etc., - the list of excuses they provide are endless. Some people have lost their life`s savings and their homes in order to send money to these fraudsters, all because they keep believing that at the end of it all, millions of dollars will be handed over to them! If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is! And in the case of the 419 Scam, it ALWAYS is!

Recently, the Scam Artists have been going back to previous victims, pretending that they represent some government organization that helps people who were victimized by a 419 scam artist. The scammer contacts the victim saying that their organization can track and apprehend the scammer and recover the money lost by the victim, for a price. Alternatively, the scammer may say that a fund has been set up by the Nigerian government to compensate victims of 419 fraud, and all that is required is proof of loss (which usually includes personal information) and a processing and handling fee to release the amount of the claim. The scammer is counting on the victim's dire need to recover their lost money, as well as the fact that they have fallen victim before and are therefore susceptible to such scams. Often, these scams are perpetrated by the exact same scammer who conned the victim in the first place, as an attempt to ensure the scammer gets every penny possible from the victim. Alternatively, the original scammer "sells" a list of the people he has scammed but who have ceased contact to another scammer who runs the recovery scam. Sometimes the scammer impersonates the foremost "fraud related crime-fighters" in Nigeria, the EFCC (Economic and Financial Crimes Commission), which not only adds credibility to the scam, but tarnishes the reputation of the EFCC once this second scam is discovered.

There are newer and more complicated versions of these scams happening all the time. The `Romance Scam`takes place when the Scam Artist finds someone via an online matchmaker service. They prey on usually older, divorced or widowed lonely women, because many of them are more gullible due to their desire to find love. They develop a relationship with these women, writing love letters back and forth, sending photos of themselves (which are always fake) and then when it is finally time to meet in person, they come up with some sob story about how they were recently robbed and have no money.....or that someone in their family is ill and needs money for surgery or to go to the doctor, or simply that they need money to purchase a passport and a plane ticket. If the woman insists that she buys the plane ticket for them, they will not show up at the airport; instead, they wait a few days and then contact the woman, telling them about how they were in a horrible automobile accident on the way to the airport, and the hospital will not release him unless he pays his hospital bill in cash - and could she please wire transfer the money to his relative so that he can pick it up for him and pay the hospital bill - this way he can get out of the hospital and fly out to see her. The woman sends the money, and waits for her potential new lover to arrive.....which he never does. He will continue to have legal troubles or financial troubles or problems leaving the country, all of which will require her to send more money to help him, so that he can finally come to her. This will continue on for as long as the woman continues to fall for it and send money to him.

There is the `Vehicle Matching service`scam; The Hitman scam; The Charity Scam; Bomb threat scams; the Au Pair or Babysitter scam.....the list goes on and on! Google them, study them, learn them all! FALL FOR NONE!

I'm sorry to hear that some of you fell for this scam and are out this money. This type of fraud is classified as an "Advance Fee" scam, and the Mystery Shopper version is the most recent method that these fraudsters are using. The Advance Fee type of scam is one of the oldest tricks in the books and I'm simply stunned and saddened to hear that there are still people out there who don't recognize it when it is happening, and some end up in serious financial straits.

The way to spot a scam artist or fraud in these types of situations is quite simple......If they want you to cash checks or money orders for an amount greater than what is owed and then SEND BACK MONEY to them - IT'S A SCAM!!!!!

If you are involved in any type of deal where someone wants to pay you by money order, never give back any money unless and until your bank tells you that the funds have cleared and that the money order was real, verifiable, and authentic. Regardless of how much pressure someone is putting on you to send back the money to them, you MUST wait until your bank tells you that the issuing bank has processed the payment and the funds have cleared. Money orders take about three weeks to clear after you deposit them into your account. This is why these Scam Artists use them.....they know that they have a 3 week window of opportunity to rip you off before you are notified by your bank that the money orders were fake, and you are now responsible for giving back all of the money that you took when you cashed the check/money order - plus, they will charge you with NSF fees. Because you were the LAST PERSON TO SIGN the check or money order, they can actually press charges against you for fraud! You are 100% responsible for this money, and the person who sent you the fake money order is now long gone. The best thing to do is never get involved in this type of transaction in the first place.....because anytime someone is overpaying you and asking you to wire back the overage, it`s going to be a SCAM!

Besides this newest Mystery Shopper version of the scam, here are some other variations to look out for:
1. CLASSIFIED AD SCAM: You list an item for sale online, such as on Craigslist or Kijiji. A "Buyer" contacts you, telling you that they would like to buy the item from you, but they are currently out of the state or the country, so they want to have it shipped to them. They send you a money order to cover the amount of the item for sale, and to cover the costs of shipping the item to them. Once you cash the money order, a "Courier" will arrive from a "Shipping Company" to pick up the item they are buying from you. Using the funds from the now cashed money order, you will then pay the Courier the amount that he requires for shipping costs when he arrives. Some of the Fraudsters will tell you that you can keep any extra amount of money after you pay the Courier and after you take out the money to cover the cost of the item you are selling; Others will ask that you send back the overage to them via Western Union, and they ask that you give them the confirmation code for the wire transfer so that they can pick up the "leftover funds" from the transaction. 3 weeks later, the money order bounces. You are now out all of the money, all of the bank fees, and the item you sold is gone - and so is the guy who "bought" it from you! He and his so-called Courier are either working together or are one and the same person, and you have just cashed a fake money order for them, and handed the cash right to them.....and you gave away your item to them for free.

2. Another variation of the item for sale scam is that the fake buyer will send you the money order for the item and for the shipping, and then ask that you cash the money order and then wire transfer the money to a (fake) shipping company, using Western Union or Moneygram. Once you do this, no shipping company ever arrives to pick up your item for sale, and of course a few weeks later the money order bounces and you are stuck paying that money back to your bank (or wherever you cashed it).

3. Property or Vacation rentals: The scam artist expresses interest in renting a property for a much higher than normal rate, usually for an upcoming honeymoon, business trip, etc. The fraudster also offers to pay all fees "up front," as soon as the unsuspecting unit owner agrees to the windfall rental. Eventually a very official looking money order/cashier's check arrives. About this time the scam artist requests that a portion of the rental fee be returned for some compelling reason... such as the wedding being called off, a death in the family, or a business failure, etc. The scam artist asks the owner of the unit to refund the money to him via wire transfer. The unit owner is encouraged to retain "a fair amount" of money to compensate him for his time. The wire transfer is sent, only to find out later that the official looking check was indeed fake and the entire amount is charged back to the unit owner by his bank.

4. Another variation of the property rental scam......A foreign student, doctor, etc. contacts a landlord seeking accommodation. Once the terms are negotiated, a forged check is forwarded for a greater amount than negotiated. Then some emergency comes up where some part of the amount is requested to be urgently wired back. The reverse may also happen, where the Scam Artist posts an accommodation for rent, and requests monies be wired as deposit. The victim arrives to discover they have no accommodation, and the Scam Artist is long gone - as wire transfers are relatively untraceable.

5. Blind/Deaf/Disabled/Unable to write a check for some odd reason Scam. A potential victim is contacted either via the internet or phone through the use of a phone operator who translates TTD calls, speaking for the Scam Artist directly to the potential victim. (Phone companies are NOT allowed to interfere with these types of calls, even when they know or suspect that a fraudulent activity is taking place.) Using a phone company TTD translator actually gives confidence to the potential victim that the call is legitimate, and that they are actually being contacted by a person who truly needs help. Some of these check writing & cashing scammers use multiple victims at multiple stages of the scam. A potential victim in the US or other "safe" country such as the UK or Canada is approached with an offer to fill out checks for the Scam Artist - using a disability or some story as to why he is unable to write out the checks himself. Many times the Scammer finds you on a resume posting website, and asks if you would be interested in taking this type of `Job`, which he would pay you for your services. The blank checks are usually sent to the victim, asking that he fill out the checks and then mail them to other victims who cash the check and wire the money to the scammer. The check mailer waits to be paid for having written these checks for his `boss`- but the payment never occurs, and in fact the check mailer is often conned into paying for the production and shipping costs of the checks. The check information has either been stolen or fictionalized and the checks forged. The victim mailing the check is usually far easier to track (and prosecute) than the scammer, so when the checks turn up as fraudulent, the one mailing them usually ends up not only facing federal bank fraud and conspiracy charges, but liability for the full amount of all of the fraudulent checks. Because the victim - the check mailer - is taking the fall, the scammer is even less likely to be caught, which makes it a popular variation of the scam for scammers in nations with tougher anti-fraud laws.

6. Pet For Sale scheme: Similar to the Classified Ad or Craigslist Scam......A potential victim is found through the classified ads, someone who has posted an ad selling their dog or cat or puppies, etc. The Scam Artist is usually calling from outside of the country - Ghana, Nigeria, and the Ivory Coast are the most common - so they make the call through an untraceable call relay system. They speak to the seller about purchasing the pet, and express a high level of interest in the pet for sale. In order to build trust, the scam artist asks for the sellers e-mail address, and then proceeds to send e-mail messages to the seller, asking more questions about the pet, and demonstrating his increasing desire to buy the animal. After a few messages have transpired back and forth between the Scam Artist and the Seller, the fake buyer then tells the seller of the animal that he is not located close enough to him to pick up the animal in person, and wants to know if the Seller would be willing to ship the pet to him if he sends him the money for the shipping. The structure of the scam is that the seller of the animal (the victim) will now have developed trust in the buyer, due to the number of conversations they have already had, and he has managed to obtain the asking price of the animal in full. Because of this trust and because he is happy to be paid the full fee for the animal, he agrees to take a check or money order for the amount of the pet plus the shipping fees. The victim also agrees to cash the check and then wire the funds to the shipping company - who is actually the scammer - through a Western Union location. The "shipper" is often non-existent and described as being "private". Once the money has been wired, the scammer wins - the check or money order bounces, and no shipping company ever shows up for the animal. The only bright spot in this scam is that the seller never actually ships the animal to the scam artist. Instead, he cashes a fake check and sends most of the money back to the Scammer; he loses the money that he thought he had made in the sale of this animal, and he gets stuck having to reimburse it to his bank for the entire amount.

Along these same lines, the scam artist might also pose as a person who is selling the pet. A scammer first posts an advertisement or sets up a web page offering puppies for adoption or for sale at a ridiculously low price, most often using stolen pictures from other websites and respectable breeders. When a victim responds to the ad and questions the lowered price or the reason for giving up such an expensive pet, the scammer first explains that they have recently moved to Nigeria or Cameroon from the US for work (usually volunteer work as missionaries or a UN transfer) or for studies, and claims either to have no time to properly care for the pet, that the weather has had such a terrible toll on the pet, or that they have too many pets to care for- often asking if the potential buyer (victim) would be willing to send photos of the pet back to him afterwards, so that the seller knows their once loved pet is in a good home and is happy - this is done so that the victim does not suspect a scam.

Once the Scam Artist tells the victim that he believes they offer the right home for the pet, the scammer offers to ship the pet, and requests the victim only pay for shipping, or comes off the original price substantially to seem legitimate. The victim, who now has an emotional attachment to the pet, feels obligated and even happy to do so, as shipping is a small price to pay compared to the pet's full price at a shop or breeder. The scammer requests Western Union or MoneyGram (untraceable and irreversible) to keep the deal going in a timely fashion as the pet is ready to go to a new home and the victim is now excited. However, after wiring money, the victim does not receive the pet (as it does not exist), and if the victim does hear from the scammer again it is only for more money (to get animal out of airport holding/quarantine, "refundable" life-insurance fees or to pay unexpected vet bills that have come up) until the victim stops responding. This is extremely common currently in Nigeria and Cameroon.

There are lots of Scam Artists out there, and they try every trick they can think of to get your money. If you receive a letter telling you that you have won millions of dollars in a lottery that you never entered and never heard of - it`s a SCAM! They will ask you to send THEM money in order for them to pay you these lottery winnings. Have you EVER in your life heard of any legitimate lottery that notifies winners via e-mail? (usually without mentioning your name in the message - they simply say Hello, but never do they know your full name!)....of course not! Have you ever legitimately won a sum of money from a lottery that you never entered? Have you ever heard of anyone receiving lottery winnings from a lottery in another country that they have never visited and never purchased a lottery ticket from? Do lottery winners in any US state or any province in Canada have to pay an upfront fee to `release` the winnings to them, which they are required to pay to some random attorney via a wire transfer? NO, No, and NO!!! It`s fake. Don`t fall for it.

How about the ever popular Nigerian Money Scam - aka 419 Scam - where some random person contacts you, asking for your help in getting money out of their country. They usually claim that their father was assassinated and they have to leave their country and need your help in getting the families hidden millions of dollars out of their country and into a bank account in your country....all you have to do for them is send them some money in order to buy them a plane ticket or a release fee or legal fees or interest, etc., etc., - the list of excuses they provide are endless. Some people have lost their life`s savings and their homes in order to send money to these fraudsters, all because they keep believing that at the end of it all, millions of dollars will be handed over to them! If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is! And in the case of the 419 Scam, it ALWAYS is!

Recently, the Scam Artists have been going back to previous victims, pretending that they represent some government organization that helps people who were victimized by a 419 scam artist. The scammer contacts the victim saying that their organization can track and apprehend the scammer and recover the money lost by the victim, for a price. Alternatively, the scammer may say that a fund has been set up by the Nigerian government to compensate victims of 419 fraud, and all that is required is proof of loss (which usually includes personal information) and a processing and handling fee to release the amount of the claim. The scammer is counting on the victim's dire need to recover their lost money, as well as the fact that they have fallen victim before and are therefore susceptible to such scams. Often, these scams are perpetrated by the exact same scammer who conned the victim in the first place, as an attempt to ensure the scammer gets every penny possible from the victim. Alternatively, the original scammer "sells" a list of the people he has scammed but who have ceased contact to another scammer who runs the recovery scam. Sometimes the scammer impersonates the foremost "fraud related crime-fighters" in Nigeria, the EFCC (Economic and Financial Crimes Commission), which not only adds credibility to the scam, but tarnishes the reputation of the EFCC once this second scam is discovered.

There are newer and more complicated versions of these scams happening all the time. The `Romance Scam`takes place when the Scam Artist finds someone via an online matchmaker service. They prey on usually older, divorced or widowed lonely women, because many of them are more gullible due to their desire to find love. They develop a relationship with these women, writing love letters back and forth, sending photos of themselves (which are always fake) and then when it is finally time to meet in person, they come up with some sob story about how they were recently robbed and have no money.....or that someone in their family is ill and needs money for surgery or to go to the doctor, or simply that they need money to purchase a passport and a plane ticket. If the woman insists that she buys the plane ticket for them, they will not show up at the airport; instead, they wait a few days and then contact the woman, telling them about how they were in a horrible automobile accident on the way to the airport, and the hospital will not release him unless he pays his hospital bill in cash - and could she please wire transfer the money to his relative so that he can pick it up for him and pay the hospital bill - this way he can get out of the hospital and fly out to see her. The woman sends the money, and waits for her potential new lover to arrive.....which he never does. He will continue to have legal troubles or financial troubles or problems leaving the country, all of which will require her to send more money to help him, so that he can finally come to her. This will continue on for as long as the woman continues to fall for it and send money to him.

There is the `Vehicle Matching service`scam; The Hitman scam; The Charity Scam; Bomb threat scams; the Au Pair or Babysitter scam.....the list goes on and on! Google them, study them, learn them all! FALL FOR NONE!

I'm sorry to hear that some of you fell for this scam and are out this money. This type of fraud is classified as an "Advance Fee" scam, and the Mystery Shopper version is the most recent method that these fraudsters are using. The Advance Fee type of scam is one of the oldest tricks in the books and I'm simply stunned and saddened to hear that there are still people out there who don't recognize it when it is happening, and some end up in serious financial straits.

The way to spot a scam artist or fraud in these types of situations is quite simple......If they want you to cash checks or money orders for an amount greater than what is owed and then SEND BACK MONEY to them - IT'S A SCAM!!!!!

If you are involved in any type of deal where someone wants to pay you by money order, never give back any money unless and until your bank tells you that the funds have cleared and that the money order was real, verifiable, and authentic. Regardless of how much pressure someone is putting on you to send back the money to them, you MUST wait until your bank tells you that the issuing bank has processed the payment and the funds have cleared. Money orders take about three weeks to clear after you deposit them into your account. This is why these Scam Artists use them.....they know that they have a 3 week window of opportunity to rip you off before you are notified by your bank that the money orders were fake, and you are now responsible for giving back all of the money that you took when you cashed the check/money order - plus, they will charge you with NSF fees. Because you were the LAST PERSON TO SIGN the check or money order, they can actually press charges against you for fraud! You are 100% responsible for this money, and the person who sent you the fake money order is now long gone. The best thing to do is never get involved in this type of transaction in the first place.....because anytime someone is overpaying you and asking you to wire back the overage, it`s going to be a SCAM!

Besides this newest Mystery Shopper version of the scam, here are some other variations to look out for:
1. CLASSIFIED AD SCAM: You list an item for sale online, such as on Craigslist or Kijiji. A "Buyer" contacts you, telling you that they would like to buy the item from you, but they are currently out of the state or the country, so they want to have it shipped to them. They send you a money order to cover the amount of the item for sale, and to cover the costs of shipping the item to them. Once you cash the money order, a "Courier" will arrive from a "Shipping Company" to pick up the item they are buying from you. Using the funds from the now cashed money order, you will then pay the Courier the amount that he requires for shipping costs when he arrives. Some of the Fraudsters will tell you that you can keep any extra amount of money after you pay the Courier and after you take out the money to cover the cost of the item you are selling; Others will ask that you send back the overage to them via Western Union, and they ask that you give them the confirmation code for the wire transfer so that they can pick up the "leftover funds" from the transaction. 3 weeks later, the money order bounces. You are now out all of the money, all of the bank fees, and the item you sold is gone - and so is the guy who "bought" it from you! He and his so-called Courier are either working together or are one and the same person, and you have just cashed a fake money order for them, and handed the cash right to them.....and you gave away your item to them for free.

2. Another variation of the item for sale scam is that the fake buyer will send you the money order for the item and for the shipping, and then ask that you cash the money order and then wire transfer the money to a (fake) shipping company, using Western Union or Moneygram. Once you do this, no shipping company ever arrives to pick up your item for sale, and of course a few weeks later the money order bounces and you are stuck paying that money back to your bank (or wherever you cashed it).

3. Property or Vacation rentals: The scam artist expresses interest in renting a property for a much higher than normal rate, usually for an upcoming honeymoon, business trip, etc. The fraudster also offers to pay all fees "up front," as soon as the unsuspecting unit owner agrees to the windfall rental. Eventually a very official looking money order/cashier's check arrives. About this time the scam artist requests that a portion of the rental fee be returned for some compelling reason... such as the wedding being called off, a death in the family, or a business failure, etc. The scam artist asks the owner of the unit to refund the money to him via wire transfer. The unit owner is encouraged to retain "a fair amount" of money to compensate him for his time. The wire transfer is sent, only to find out later that the official looking check was indeed fake and the entire amount is charged back to the unit owner by his bank.

4. Another variation of the property rental scam......A foreign student, doctor, etc. contacts a landlord seeking accommodation. Once the terms are negotiated, a forged check is forwarded for a greater amount than negotiated. Then some emergency comes up where some part of the amount is requested to be urgently wired back. The reverse may also happen, where the Scam Artist posts an accommodation for rent, and requests monies be wired as deposit. The victim arrives to discover they have no accommodation, and the Scam Artist is long gone - as wire transfers are relatively untraceable.

5. Blind/Deaf/Disabled/Unable to write a check for some odd reason Scam. A potential victim is contacted either via the internet or phone through the use of a phone operator who translates TTD calls, speaking for the Scam Artist directly to the potential victim. (Phone companies are NOT allowed to interfere with these types of calls, even when they know or suspect that a fraudulent activity is taking place.) Using a phone company TTD translator actually gives confidence to the potential victim that the call is legitimate, and that they are actually being contacted by a person who truly needs help. Some of these check writing & cashing scammers use multiple victims at multiple stages of the scam. A potential victim in the US or other "safe" country such as the UK or Canada is approached with an offer to fill out checks for the Scam Artist - using a disability or some story as to why he is unable to write out the checks himself. Many times the Scammer finds you on a resume posting website, and asks if you would be interested in taking this type of `Job`, which he would pay you for your services. The blank checks are usually sent to the victim, asking that he fill out the checks and then mail them to other victims who cash the check and wire the money to the scammer. The check mailer waits to be paid for having written these checks for his `boss`- but the payment never occurs, and in fact the check mailer is often conned into paying for the production and shipping costs of the checks. The check information has either been stolen or fictionalized and the checks forged. The victim mailing the check is usually far easier to track (and prosecute) than the scammer, so when the checks turn up as fraudulent, the one mailing them usually ends up not only facing federal bank fraud and conspiracy charges, but liability for the full amount of all of the fraudulent checks. Because the victim - the check mailer - is taking the fall, the scammer is even less likely to be caught, which makes it a popular variation of the scam for scammers in nations with tougher anti-fraud laws.

There are lots of Scam Artists out there, and they try every trick they can think of to get your money. If you receive a letter telling you that you have won millions of dollars in a lottery that you never entered and never heard of - it`s a SCAM! They will ask you to send THEM money in order for them to pay you these lottery winnings. Have you EVER in your life heard of any legitimate lottery that notifies winners via e-mail? (usually without mentioning your name in the message - they simply say Hello, but never do they know your full name!)....of course not! Have you ever legitimately won a sum of money from a lottery that you never entered? Have you ever heard of anyone receiving lottery winnings from a lottery in another country that they have never visited and never purchased a lottery ticket from? Do lottery winners in any US state or any province in Canada have to pay an upfront fee to `release` the winnings to them, which they are required to pay to some random attorney via a wire transfer? NO, No, and NO!!! It`s fake. Don`t fall for it.

How about the ever popular Nigerian Money Scam - aka 419 Scam - where some random person contacts you, asking for your help in getting money out of their country. They usually claim that their father was assassinated and they have to leave their country and need your help in getting the families hidden millions of dollars out of their country and into a bank account in your country....all you have to do for them is send them some money in order to buy them a plane ticket or a release fee or legal fees or interest, etc., etc., - the list of excuses they provide are endless. Some people have lost their life`s savings and their homes in order to send money to these fraudsters, all because they keep believing that at the end of it all, millions of dollars will be handed over to them! If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is! And in the case of the 419 Scam, it ALWAYS is!

Recently, the Scam Artists have been going back to previous victims, pretending that they represent some government organization that helps people who were victimized by a 419 scam artist. The scammer contacts the victim saying that their organization can track and apprehend the scammer and recover the money lost by the victim, for a price. Alternatively, the scammer may say that a fund has been set up by the Nigerian government to compensate victims of 419 fraud, and all that is required is proof of loss (which usually includes personal information) and a processing and handling fee to release the amount of the claim. The scammer is counting on the victim's dire need to recover their lost money, as well as the fact that they have fallen victim before and are therefore susceptible to such scams. Often, these scams are perpetrated by the exact same scammer who conned the victim in the first place, as an attempt to ensure the scammer gets every penny possible from the victim. Alternatively, the original scammer "sells" a list of the people he has scammed but who have ceased contact to another scammer who runs the recovery scam. Sometimes the scammer impersonates the foremost "fraud related crime-fighters" in Nigeria, the EFCC (Economic and Financial Crimes Commission), which not only adds credibility to the scam, but tarnishes the reputation of the EFCC once this second scam is discovered.

There are newer and more complicated versions of these scams happening all the time. The `Romance Scam`takes place when the Scam Artist finds someone via an online matchmaker service. They prey on usually older, divorced or widowed lonely women, because many of them are more gullible due to their desire to find love. They develop a relationship with these women, writing love letters back and forth, sending photos of themselves (which are always fake) and then when it is finally time to meet in person, they come up with some sob story about how they were recently robbed and have no money.....or that someone in their family is ill and needs money for surgery or to go to the doctor, or simply that they need money to purchase a passport and a plane ticket. If the woman insists that she buys the plane ticket for them, they will not show up at the airport; instead, they wait a few days and then contact the woman, telling them about how they were in a horrible automobile accident on the way to the airport, and the hospital will not release him unless he pays his hospital bill in cash - and could she please wire transfer the money to his relative so that he can pick it up for him and pay the hospital bill - this way he can get out of the hospital and fly out to see her. The woman sends the money, and waits for her potential new lover to arrive.....which he never does. He will continue to have legal troubles or financial troubles or problems leaving the country, all of which will require her to send more money to help him, so that he can finally come to her. This will continue on for as long as the woman continues to fall for it and send money to him.

There is the `Vehicle Matching service`scam; The Hitman scam; The pet for sale scam; The Charity Scam; Bomb threat scams; the Au Pair or Babysitter scam.....the list goes on and on! Google them, study them, learn them all! FALL FOR NONE!

I'm sorry to hear that some of you fell for this scam and are out this money. This type of fraud is classified as an "Advance Fee" scam, and the Mystery Shopper version is the most recent method that these fraudsters are using. The Advance Fee type of scam is one of the oldest tricks in the books and I'm simply stunned and saddened to hear that there are still people out there who don't recognize it when it is happening, and some end up in serious financial straits.

The way to spot a scam artist or fraud in these types of situations is quite simple......If they want you to cash checks or money orders for an amount greater than what is owed and then SEND BACK MONEY to them - IT'S A SCAM!!!!!

If you are involved in any type of deal where someone wants to pay you by money order, never give back any money unless and until your bank tells you that the funds have cleared and that the money order was real, verifiable, and authentic. Regardless of how much pressure someone is putting on you to send back the money to them, you MUST wait until your bank tells you that the issuing bank has processed the payment and the funds have cleared. Money orders take about three weeks to clear after you deposit them into your account. This is why these Scam Artists use them.....they know that they have a 3 week window of opportunity to rip you off before you are notified by your bank that the money orders were fake, and you are now responsible for giving back all of the money that you took when you cashed the check/money order - plus, they will charge you with NSF fees. Because you were the LAST PERSON TO SIGN the check or money order, they can actually press charges against you for fraud! You are 100% responsible for this money, and the person who sent you the fake money order is now long gone. The best thing to do is never get involved in this type of transaction in the first place.....because anytime someone is overpaying you and asking you to wire back the overage, it`s going to be a SCAM!

Besides this newest Mystery Shopper version of the scam, here are some other variations to look out for:
1. CLASSIFIED AD SCAM: You list an item for sale online, such as on Craigslist or Kijiji. A "Buyer" contacts you, telling you that they would like to buy the item from you, but they are currently out of the state or the country, so they want to have it shipped to them. They send you a money order to cover the amount of the item for sale, and to cover the costs of shipping the item to them. Once you cash the money order, a "Courier" will arrive from a "Shipping Company" to pick up the item they are buying from you. Using the funds from the now cashed money order, you will then pay the Courier the amount that he requires for shipping costs when he arrives. Some of the Fraudsters will tell you that you can keep any extra amount of money after you pay the Courier and after you take out the money to cover the cost of the item you are selling; Others will ask that you send back the overage to them via Western Union, and they ask that you give them the confirmation code for the wire transfer so that they can pick up the "leftover funds" from the transaction. 3 weeks later, the money order bounces. You are now out all of the money, all of the bank fees, and the item you sold is gone - and so is the guy who "bought" it from you! He and his so-called Courier are either working together or are one and the same person, and you have just cashed a fake money order for them, and handed the cash right to them.....and you gave away your item to them for free.

2. Another variation of the item for sale scam is that the fake buyer will send you the money order for the item and for the shipping, and then ask that you cash the money order and then wire transfer the money to a (fake) shipping company, using Western Union or Moneygram. Once you do this, no shipping company ever arrives to pick up your item for sale, and of course a few weeks later the money order bounces and you are stuck paying that money back to your bank (or wherever you cashed it).

3. Property or Vacation rentals: The scam artist expresses interest in renting a property for a much higher than normal rate, usually for an upcoming honeymoon, business trip, etc. The fraudster also offers to pay all fees "up front," as soon as the unsuspecting unit owner agrees to the windfall rental. Eventually a very official looking money order/cashier's check arrives. About this time the scam artist requests that a portion of the rental fee be returned for some compelling reason... such as the wedding being called off, a death in the family, or a business failure, etc. The scam artist asks the owner of the unit to refund the money to him via wire transfer. The unit owner is encouraged to retain "a fair amount" of money to compensate him for his time. The wire transfer is sent, only to find out later that the official looking check was indeed fake and the entire amount is charged back to the unit owner by his bank.

4. Another variation of the property rental scam......A foreign student, doctor, etc. contacts a landlord seeking accommodation. Once the terms are negotiated, a forged check is forwarded for a greater amount than negotiated. Then some emergency comes up where some part of the amount is requested to be urgently wired back. The reverse may also happen, where the Scam Artist posts an accommodation for rent, and requests monies be wired as deposit. The victim arrives to discover they have no accommodation, and the Scam Artist is long gone - as wire transfers are relatively untraceable.

5. Blind/Deaf/Disabled/Unable to write a check for some odd reason Scam. A potential victim is contacted either via the internet or phone through the use of a phone operator who translates TTD calls, speaking for the Scam Artist directly to the potential victim. (Phone companies are NOT allowed to interfere with these types of calls, even when they know or suspect that a fraudulent activity is taking place.) Using a phone company TTD translator actually gives confidence to the potential victim that the call is legitimate, and that they are actually being contacted by a person who truly needs help. Some of these check writing & cashing scammers use multiple victims at multiple stages of the scam. A potential victim in the US or other "safe" country such as the UK or Canada is approached with an offer to fill out checks for the Scam Artist - using a disability or some story as to why he is unable to write out the checks himself. Many times the Scammer finds you on a resume posting website, and asks if you would be interested in taking this type of `Job`, which he would pay you for your services. The blank checks are usually sent to the victim, asking that he fill out the checks and then mail them to other victims who cash the check and wire the money to the scammer. The check mailer waits to be paid for having written these checks for his `boss`- but the payment never occurs, and in fact the check mailer is often conned into paying for the production and shipping costs of the checks. The check information has either been stolen or fictionalized and the checks forged. The victim mailing the check is usually far easier to track (and prosecute) than the scammer, so when the checks turn up as fraudulent, the one mailing them usually ends up not only facing federal bank fraud and conspiracy charges, but liability for the full amount of all of the fraudulent checks. Because the victim - the check mailer - is taking the fall, the scammer is even less likely to be caught, which makes it a popular variation of the scam for scammers in nations with tougher anti-fraud laws.

There are lots of Scam Artists out there, and they try every trick they can think of to get your money. If you receive a letter telling you that you have won millions of dollars in a lottery that you never entered and never heard of - it`s a SCAM! They will ask you to send THEM money in order for them to pay you these lottery winnings. Have you EVER in your life heard of any legitimate lottery that notifies winners via e-mail? (usually without mentioning your name in the message - they simply say Hello, but never do they know your full name!)....of course not! Have you ever legitimately won a sum of money from a lottery that you never entered? Have you ever heard of anyone receiving lottery winnings from a lottery in another country that they have never visited and never purchased a lottery ticket from? Do lottery winners in any US state or any province in Canada have to pay an upfront fee to `release` the winnings to them, which they are required to pay to some random attorney via a wire transfer? NO, No, and NO!!! It`s fake. Don`t fall for it.

How about the ever popular Nigerian Money Scam - aka 419 Scam - where some random person contacts you, asking for your help in getting money out of their country. They usually claim that their father was assassinated and they have to leave their country and need your help in getting the families hidden millions of dollars out of their country and into a bank account in your country....all you have to do for them is send them some money in order to buy them a plane ticket or a release fee or legal fees or interest, etc., etc., - the list of excuses they provide are endless. Some people have lost their life`s savings and their homes in order to send money to these fraudsters, all because they keep believing that at the end of it all, millions of dollars will be handed over to them! If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is! And in the case of the 419 Scam, it ALWAYS is!

Recently, the Scam Artists have been going back to previous victims, pretending that they represent some government organization that helps people who were victimized by a 419 scam artist. The scammer contacts the victim saying that their organization can track and apprehend the scammer and recover the money lost by the victim, for a price. Alternatively, the scammer may say that a fund has been set up by the Nigerian government to compensate victims of 419 fraud, and all that is required is proof of loss (which usually includes personal information) and a processing and handling fee to release the amount of the claim. The scammer is counting on the victim's dire need to recover their lost money, as well as the fact that they have fallen victim before and are therefore susceptible to such scams. Often, these scams are perpetrated by the exact same scammer who conned the victim in the first place, as an attempt to ensure the scammer gets every penny possible from the victim. Alternatively, the original scammer "sells" a list of the people he has scammed but who have ceased contact to another scammer who runs the recovery scam. Sometimes the scammer impersonates the foremost "fraud related crime-fighters" in Nigeria, the EFCC (Economic and Financial Crimes Commission), which not only adds credibility to the scam, but tarnishes the reputation of the EFCC once this second scam is discovered.

There are newer and more complicated versions of these scams happening all the time. The `Romance Scam`takes place when the Scam Artist finds someone via an online matchmaker service. They prey on usually older, divorced or widowed lonely women, because many of them are more gullible due to their desire to find love. They develop a relationship with these women, writing love letters back and forth, sending photos of themselves (which are always fake) and then when it is finally time to meet in person, they come up with some sob story about how they were recently robbed and have no money.....or that someone in their family is ill and needs money for surgery or to go to the doctor, or simply that they need money to purchase a passport and a plane ticket. If the woman insists that she buys the plane ticket for them, they will not show up at the airport; instead, they wait a few days and then contact the woman, telling them about how they were in a horrible automobile accident on the way to the airport, and the hospital will not release him unless he pays his hospital bill in cash - and could she please wire transfer the money to his relative so that he can pick it up for him and pay the hospital bill - this way he can get out of the hospital and fly out to see her. The woman sends the money, and waits for her potential new lover to arrive.....which he never does. He will continue to have legal troubles or financial troubles or problems leaving the country, all of which will require her to send more money to help him, so that he can finally come to her. This will continue on for as long as the woman continues to fall for it and send money to him.

There is the `Vehicle Matching service`scam; The Hitman scam; The pet for sale scam; The Charity Scam; Bomb threat scams; the Au Pair or Babysitter scam.....the list goes on and on! Google them, study them, learn them all! FALL FOR NONE!

I am still very confused if I am reading your comments correctly you cashed there money order and sent them back cash. WHY WOULD YOU DO THAT? WHY WOULD THEY SEND YOU MONEY AND YOU SEND IT BACK.

Confused,
OK, with mystery shopping, you get assignments to check out certain businesses. To check out how the business certain transactions. Like how long did the transaction take, Were they friendly, etc. So, they sent me money orders and asked me to do a wester union transaction. They sent me a form to fill out, how long did it take to do the transaction, how fast and efficeint was western union, how far is it from your home, is the neighborhook safe for handlling money transfers, etc...So they ask you to do the assignment. They pay for the transaction (with unknown counterfiet money orders). Those money orders have all the security features like real ones. They are good enough to pass the bank teller and according to the postal service, it can take months to find out that a cashed money order is fake. Why it can take so long I do not know. Anyways, that is the way mystery shopping works, they ask you to shop or do bank transactions, and they pay up front, we get paid to do these. However, unlike mystery woman, who has been a mystery shopper for a while, this was my first "assignment" with them. And like she said, everything looks and seems to real to be fake. Apparantly they hacked the real mystery shopper web site and managed to get ahold of people like me. So, yes I did cash the checks, and did the western union money transfer, thinking I was making $250.00 for doing it. However, all i really got was $250.00 of my own money out of my bank account. I still do not know if the money orders I cashed the first time are fake. As the bank has not yet advised me, and it;s now been over a week since I cashed them. But since the 4 more they sent me are in fact fake, I have to assume that the first 2 are as well. I am only hoping that the first 2 were real so that they could get me hooked and then they could start sending the fake one's. But I am afraid that is only wishful thinking.

They are targetting people that are certified Mystery Shoppers. They hacked into the MSPA information, so when you receive the assignment you think it is legit from MSPA themselves. They send it from the company and you are to send it to another company, the same company back, or another person, point of sending the money is to evaluate Western Unions Money in Minutes service

Mystery,
Where did they ask you to western union the money to? Just curious because they asked me to send it to Los Angeles to a person that lives there. I have been compiling as much info as I can. I have copies of all the emails. saved the cell phone messages and texts, and have all the original envelopes and letters. Hopefully, some agency will be interested enough to take what I have compiled and investigate these people. Yesterday, I had 4 phone calls from them, they wanted to know if I cashed the money orders yet and were wanting me to cash them ASAP. Also, they had accents that was very hard to understand, Possibly Arab or some accent like they have. I was in a place that my cell phone couldn't pick up a lot of what he was saying, but while I was trying to talk to him, another call was coming in from another guy asking the same thing. What about the money orders? I wonder how many people are involved in this. The UPS express envelope I got, with the 4 money orders came from canada, but the money orders are signed by someone in Los Angeles. I am I the process of filing a complaint with the RCMP as well as everyone else I have filed with.

WHo is RCMP? Um Mine were for the same amount and yes one to Los Angeles, and one to Lagos, Nigeria,.WHICH I DID NOT SEND. I am also out the money, im a single mother, it sucks veryyyy much, they clear in one day and then a week later the bank returns them as counterfeit and u get charged 10 for each returned money order. Um no shops are not usually this much I just figured they were sooo much because they are soooo risky. which i know now that I will never do this again. Im not gonna let one jackass ruin my mystery shop profession, IM just going to stick to the Shadow Shopper assignments, which is who I am certified through and keep all my legal agreements, incase anything like this ever happens again. This guy should be taken down but unfortuantly he is like a ghost and cant be found

Mystery,
RCMP is the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, due to the fact that the UPS envelope came from Canada. I have received 2 tests and 3 phone calls, with at least 1 new ph # to add to my collection. And they are sounding pretty desperate that those money orders get cashed. Each text and call and message gets a little more forceful. I am playing them off like I still have every intention if cashing them and transferring the money. I want to get as much info as I can collect without making them suspicious. I know chances of catching them is slim to none, but if I can at least end up making them even slightly uncomfortable, I will do what I can for them,
Have you reported them to anyone yourself? You might try. According to western union, there is a group out there that may be able to help you out monetarily if you were hurt too badly, and these days, any money I don't intend to spend hurts...
Debbie

HOW DO I GO ABOUT REPORTING IT TO THE DIFFERENT PEOPLE? I WAS READING ANOTHER REPORT ON SCAM CHECKER ABOUT THIS MAN AND FROM THE SOUNDS OF IT HE WAS ALREADY REPORTED TO THE ATTORNEY GENERAL. HOW DO I CONTACT RCMP? I DONT HAVE ANY OF THE MONEY ORDERS ANYMORE, MY BANKS FRAUD DEPARTMENT DOES

Also, ask the bank if you can have copies of the cashed money orders and tell them why you need them. otherwise, western union may have a copy or at least let them know the bank has them if they need a copy. Western Union asked me for the web site names and emails and told me that they were going to do some investigating themselves. Really? or was that said just to make me feel like they actually care? I don't really trust any them anymore, they seem more talk than action, but someone might get bored and start looking into these.

depending on where you kive, I would start with western union. If you have the copy of the transaction you made with the cashed money orders. I have kept all copies of all emails, copies of the money orders cashed and the 4 I still have not turned into the post office yet. And make copies of all emails as well. Plus I have written down all addresses where the letters came from and the UPS envelope tracking no. Plus all cell phone numbers, etc... I would call Western Union and start there, they were really patient with me and he also gave me a list of names and emails of different places to file complaints with. One is www.IC3.gov, a govt sponsored internet complaint site.Then www.fraud.org, set up by or sponsored by the FBI. Westernunion.com; www.callsforaction.org (maybe callforaction). USPS inspection service, if they notified you by mail only, found on their web site (www.usps.com); www.ups.com, if also notified by UPS, look for filing complaints on the main page. The MSPA also requests that you fax them any checks that you have or have copies of, plus any other emails, letters, etc... You can find out where to file a complaint on their website. Then the Attorney General for the state you live in. Western Union gave me the number for mine, but you can also find it on your states main page, your phone book should have the no. under the govt pages as well. The RCMP is info@antifraudcentre.ca; Also for your state, I was told to complain about financial fraud to my states consumer protection section. Given to me by my local police. And most importantly from all places I have talked to is to file a police report with your local city or county deptm depending if you live in city or county as well as your state police, This is just a back up to all other complaints filed, it makes you look more like the victim. Like you don't know that fact, but just in case the bank decided to go after you for cashing forged checks or whatever else could happen. It's gonna be time consuming. But if we can get enough of us together and file enough complaints, maybe someone will care enough to finally try and get these guys. Ph yeah, I haven't decided which one to complain to yet, but the better business bureau might be another place to file a complaint. And even your bank would be a good one too. So that maybe they can be better trained or at least aware that you are not trying to pass of counterfiet money orders. And it seems that one complaint seems to lead to another and another or at least more ideas of who to file with. In fact, since they called on my cell and left text messages, that is another place I can file with, my cell company, with me, they have crossed a lot of bounderies. mail fraud, ups, usps, internet, western union, cell co. So good luck and if I can helo you at all, please feel free to ask. And remember, keep copies of everything you get and keep track of all email addresses. names used, titles, phone numbers, etc,,, Luckily I have from done this from day 1.

the new name for the contact person for this scam is David Rodman. I signed up for this and am suppose to receive my first "assignment" today. Now that I am doing some research on this so-called company, I am gonna file all the complaints I can so I don't become a true victim of this scam. I don't have the money to cover anything this scam has so I am going to send the money orders back as soon as I get them. Thanks to sites like Scam Checker, I am gonna be saving myself a lot of headache by NOT cashing those money orders. And I'm suppose to send the wire transfer for Western Union to someone in Austin, TX. I am never going to fall for these people again. They are crooks and theives. I'm going to tell everyone about this scam and hopefully it will become so widespread that these a-holes are finally caught. One of the things that kind of tiped me off was their spelling and grammar. Since I was raised to check my spelling and grammar, there were a few mistakes that made me think "this doesn't smell right." And I'm glad I looked things up before I actually cashed the money orders otherwise I would be in some serious trouble financially.
Thanks to everyone here, I was saved the hassle of everything.

Anaonymous,
when you get the money orders, why don't you see if the local Postmaster wants them. Especially since they are made to look and feel like USPS money orders. Western Union has, in my experience, been the only ones to take this serious. they told me that they are going to do an investigation on the info I gave them. But then again, I am in possession of 4 counterfiet money orders. We called the Postmaster of my local Post Office to see if I could come turn them in. He actually told me that he wasn't interested in taking them off my hands.. Surprised the heck outta me. but I am still compilling as much info as I can on these people. I went to my bank yesterday and talked to them about this scam. They are very aware of it and told me it's from Nigeria. When I asked them why they don't call Western Union as verify the money orders, she told me that the tellers are trained to just go ahead and cash them as long as the customer has the money to cover them in their account if the orders come back. It took mine over 2 weeks to come back as no good. And I was told that it can take as much as a month or 2 to come back as not valid. So here we sit, thinking we cashed legal money orders and then a couple months later, find out that our bank accounts are now empty and we have no money to pay bills, rent or buy food. It is shameful if you ask me. Goodl luck and I will help you with any thing I can if you need any.

first off thankyou to everyone on here and I hope you all get this figured out as soon as possible I have been getting emails like this for a few months now and finally decided to look into it, I figured it was also to good to be true so I figured I should do a little research first and I am very glad that I did. I actually just got a new (similar) email so I'm guessing that people are onto them and they changed it up a bit. This is the new email I just got

Good day

Our recruiting department is looking for a mystery consumer in your location.

:

1} When an assignment is given to you,You would be provided with details to execute the assignment and in a timely fashion.
2} You would be asked to visit a company or store in your area and they are mostly our competitors as a secret shopper and shop with them to know more about their sales and stock , cost sales and more details as provided by the company then report back to us with details of whatever transpired at the store. But anything you buy at the shop belongs to you,all we want is an effective/quick job and reports.

:
Your payment would be sent ($400) per assignment funds, Also the company is in charge of providing you with all expense money for the shopping and other expenses incurred during the course of your assignment.All the tools you will needing would be provided to you with details every week you have an assignment.

:

Before any assignment we would provide you with the resources needed {cash}Mostly our company would send you a check which you can cash and use for the assignment. Included to the check would be your assignment packet .Then we would be providing you details on here. But you follow every single information given to you as a secret shopper .
After you sign up you will have access to training materials.Please send the information below to sign up.

1. Full Name
2. Contact address:(Inclusive City, State and Zip code)
3. Direct Telephone No:, ( Cell & Home )
4. Age:

Kind Regards,
David Rodman

IRGGKMBUEBZPECSPQGHOGHXZXTCQGXIUVISHKO

I received that same email yesterday. I guess it's not enough that they got a couple thousand outta me, now they wanna try and get more. Only I am done with them. And another problem I have with all this stuff is that I have filed complaints with every agency I can think of, and all of the agencies that Western Union gave me as well. And so far, none of the places I filed complaints have even so much as let me know that they got my complaint. Let alone that someone might actually be looking into this scam. It appears to me that there is no one out there even remotely intersted in stopping these people, And I told every one I filed with that I am willing to do anything I need to do to help stop them. I so much as told them that "David Anderson" is waiting for me to send the money and then call him with the western union info, so lets go set them up. Lets find out where they will be picking up the money and have the cops there to meet them. As I said before, I am in possession of 4 counterfiet money orders and my post office does not want them. All the did was mail me a very short form to fill out and told me to mail it back in. I never did get an answer as to what they want me to do with the money orders. But they didn't even want me to come to the post office and file a complaint there, and the post master didn't really want me to even come down and talk to him. And it's not like he could be that busy, I live in a town of less that 9,000 people. And I understand from my postman, that the postmaster spends most of his time out having coffee with friends. That he spends most of his workday bored. So now I understand why he doesn't want me to come down and bother him, he might miss a coffee break... I am so disgusted with all the so-called internet police and other agencies. No one wants to do their job and no one wants to help. I know that this scam has hit a lot of good people very hard, people that are just trying to put a few extra bucks in their wallet or maybe be able to buy some food or prescriptions that they couldn't normally afford. and now are finding themselves in debt to the bank for the amount of the money orders. Good luck and I a glad they didn't get you like they did me. I am usually so careful of these exact kinds of things, but due to the fact that I had been trying to become a mystery shopper and this letter came at the exact time that I signed up with them, they had me good. I will never again be a victim of anything like this.

I unfortunately got scammed by this "David Anderson" also. The postal service cashier checks I got looked very legit. I even had them cashed at my bank and since they didn't say anything about them being fake when I was there, I had figured that they were real. I went to my bank today and found out my bank account was negative. They recommended that I withdrew all the money from my savings account. I realized this was fake when I received 5 money orders instead of the 2 given at first. I'm so glad I didn't cash those or I would be out almost 5k Like others there's nothing they can do for me. Ive reported it to every one I can. So hopefully it will help catch these bastards. Be Very Careful. I will never again trust another website that's selling or trying to give jobs again.

I also received checks after sending a email saying no longer interested in your company to David Anderson. I did not cash the checks since I had decided to google the company and found all the above emails. i received several emails after the checks were sent he even tried to threaten me with the FBI saying I had absconded with company funds. i email back that i was not interested and would send the checks back. he sent additional emails saying I could not send them back but to cash them and send the funds on. i sent an additional email stating they i have doubts about the company and will not cash any checks from them. i tried to send the checks back to the address that was on the fed ex envelope and they just came back as attempted address not known. I will now have to see if fed ex can send them back or check with the post office to file a claim and get rid of these checks since i do not even want them around. any otber ideas on getting rid of these things.

Ii feel for the people that were taken on this scheme but the old adage goes, if it's to good to be true then it usually is. I was contacted at 11:30 p.m. by a person that could barely speak english that tipped me off I stumbled around with what he was saying something about e-mails, I'd quit answering them it didn't add up, now ther suspense starts I have to find out, gave them my name, address, telephone and age nothing more they asked for soc. security, DO NOT NEVER GIVE THAT OUT OVER THE INTERNET told them officially I was done with them after that ques. they continued to send me mail, then I started paying attention to the wording and how sentences were constructed. NOTHING PROFESSIAL ABOUT IT 5th graders would have done better. They finally sent me 2 CVS money order for $950.00 each. That was a real tipp off but the the biggiy is coming i was to go to Walmart, spend $100.00 on myself and judge the persons I'm dealing with and then go to WESTERN UNION the BIGGEST TIPPOFF EVER and send the money with me to keep $100.00 for myself along with the 100.00 from Walmart and the gift I was to buy myself and send the balance to the PHILLEPENNES BACK UP JACK A NATION IN DISTRESS AND THE LARGEST CRIMINALS AROUND NEXT TO NIGERIA. No fool, here. I went to CVS and asked about the money orders first,, they are fake and no longer use that type of money order, went to my local police they said oh well nothing we can do about it they get 2-3 of them per day, criminal you say, absolutely but no one seems to care, there are victims here but again NO ONE SEEMS TO CARE AND YOU CAN GET AWAY WITH THIS AS LONG AS DUMMYS THINK THEY'RE GETTING EASY MONEY. Should someone find help willing to do something I'm more than happy to assist, I have all e-mails along with the money order, also to Annonymous in Oregon you don't owe them anything don't fall victim to there threats, contact me and I'll be glad to assist you. I then sent them a email telling them that there m.orders were no good and that to continue to work for them they needed to send me something viable, tangeble that I could deal with as I don't do well with thiefs, liars and in general assholes. pardon moi. They today cont. to send me mail and have since received 2 more fed ex with bad money orders, I always check them out, At this point should they ever become real I'll probably keep them So it seems they have an unlimited supply of bad money orders and to top it off they're ripping off the fed ex acct. out of someother unsuspecting source, Talked to Fed Ex and they explained that hackers, and crooks have now invaded they're system and can print up phoney labels to allow them to mail for free. Again I would help them if needed. Buy Fed Ex is a private company so it's not a federal offense, they are usuing money orders, they're on touchy ground but not as serious as robbing a bank is worse so they did they're homework on how to skirt the law and prison times they'd be facing,

I got one of these same letter I thought it was legit i went online and looked up the company it is a real company but the man david anderson does not work for them. I went online to check to seee if the postal money orders were real they look real. I got 2 money orders for 990.12 and was told to cash them at the bank then keep 250. for my assingment and send the rest to the name on the paper and that I was testing the customer service for the western union money in minutes. i sent it but then when a man called me and was telling me that I needed to go back and get the money back and then send it to another person and he does not speak english at all I knew something was up.He said that I needed to go right away and I told him no i was not going to. he told me he would call the next day to give me the info for the other person to send it to. He said the the cammeron guy that I was suppose to send it to was not on this assingment anymore. I instintly got off the phone called western union had the transfer stopped and sent back to me. i called the police department to find out what to do and I went to the bank and told them what was going on and that i had all of the money back and that i am not sure if the money orders are real but i am sure they are not and I brought printed out pages from the internet from people saying he had done this exact thing to them and the bank said they have not come back as conterfeit yet but to put the money back in my account so that if they do that it is all there for them to take back. i tiold them here it is I do not want to be apart of this I did not know it was a skam and when I got the first clue i got the money back before they were able to pick it up. i am not sure what is going to happen now but i know i am not stealing anything and I have never ever commited fraud on anyone. the bank thought that I was strange for coming in there and being an honest person and letting them know even though they had not yet said that there were not real. I dont care though I have a family and this man is or men are not going to come along and ruin what I have been working so hard for. we need to find a way to stop these people from doing this to other people. Some one has to beable to stop them.

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